Periodontal Disease Treatment (Gum Disease)

Gum disease is a serious condition that affects people from all walks of life. We provide periodontal disease treatment services for all stages of gum disease to restore your oral health.

What is Periodontal Disease?

Periodontal disease, periodontitis, and gum disease are all phrases used to describe an infection in the gums and bone surrounding your teeth. Healthy bone and gum structures help keep a tooth’s root intact. When food and plaque get trapped between the gums and teeth, it can lead to infection, resulting in gum disease. Periodontal disease is a very serious dental disease that affects many people. It is caused by bacteria from plaque formations on the teeth.

Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums and one of the earliest stages of gum disease. Common symptoms of gingivitis include minor redness, swelling, or slight bleeding of the gums. If left untreated, gingivitis turns into a more serious infection known as periodontal disease, which can lead to permanent structural damage.

Nearly half of all adults suffer from periodontitis to some extent—periodontitis is also referred to as gum disease and occurs when the gums are left exposed to harmful bacteria, tartar, and plaque for an extended period of time. This can be caused by poor flossing habits and build-up between the teeth. If left untreated, it can progress and lead to bone and tooth loss.

We offer gum disease treatment in Chelmsford, MA. Schedule a consultation online using the link below or call our office today.

illustration of a dental pick removing plaque build up beneath the gum line due to gum disease
  • How does a dentist identify if gum disease is present?

    Identifying gum disease as early as possible is crucial to preventing bone and tooth loss. To determine if you have periodontitis, and its severity, we will:

    1. Review your medical history. Certain risk factors, such as genetics, taking certain medications, or smoking, can increase the likelihood of gum disease.
    2. Exam your teeth and gums.  If you have severe plaque/tartar build-up or your gums bleed easily are both indicators that disease is present.
    3. Measure gum pocket depth. We place a dental probe between your teeth and gums, throughout different areas within your mouth.
      • 1-3 mm is a healthy and normal gum pocket depth
      • 3-5 mm is early or mild periodontitis
      • 5-7 mm is moderate periodontitis
      • 7-10 mm is advanced periodontitis
    4. Take x-rays of your mouth. Dental x-rays can reveal if you’ve suffered any bone loss in areas where deeper gum pocket depths are present.
  • How much does periodontal treatment cost?

    If you have periodontal disease, it is crucial that you keep up on your periodontal maintenance to prevent any further damage to your teeth and gums. Our office strives to provide the best care, at the most affordable rates. Out of pocket cost for any procedure depends on your insurance coverage at the time of the procedure.

    Periodontal Maintenance: $174

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  • What causes periodontal disease or gum disease?

    Our mouths provide a home to millions of bacteria, both beneficial and harmful. Bacteria form a sticky substance, plaque, that adheres to the teeth. Brushing and flossing aim at removing plaque before it mineralizes into tartar. Tartar becomes a colony for more bacteria and adds to their population, pumping out toxins into the gums.

    Gums react to this bacterial invasion with an inflammatory response under the direction of the immune system. Around the base of each tooth, a small collar of gum tissue exists that forms a small crevice or pocket. This warm, dark environment provides a perfect habitat for deeper tartar and bacterial penetration, with their toxins seeping into the base of the collar.

    Early inflammation results in bleeding gums, known as gingivitis. Bacteria left untreated and undisturbed successfully create a chronic infection in the gum collar. In many cases, the bone begins to deteriorate around the teeth as the bacteria burrow deeper into the gums. While gums may be slightly tender at this stage, there’s generally minimal discomfort as the bone dissolves.

    More than 50% of the bone around your teeth can disappear before any signs of looseness or pain begin to appear. The bone around teeth never regenerates, so this loss becomes permanent and harder to control as the bacteria hide deeper into the gums. Untreated gum disease leads to abscesses and generalized tooth loss in many advanced cases.

  • How do I prevent periodontal disease or gum disease?

    The best way to prevent gum disease is regular oral health care. This is critical to slow down and stop the progression of gum disease. You should brush your teeth twice a day for two minutes and floss before you brush. This disrupts the bacteria and plaque in your mouth.

    Regular dental visits and professional teeth cleanings are a great way to ensure any plaque build-up is removed effectively from your teeth and below the gum line. Within a few hours of a careful cleaning, the bacteria begin to repopulate and adhere to the teeth. Plaque left undisturbed will start to harden and mineralize within 24 hours. And deeper gum pockets require even more diligence to prevent the bacteria from burrowing further into the foundation of your teeth.

    Since the deepest sections of gum pockets previously damaged by bacteria can be difficult to reach home, a particular maintenance schedule with us proves essential. We can customize your plan to include 2, 3, or 4 visits a year depending on the severity of the disease and its response to treatment and home care.

  • What is gum recession?

    Receding gums affect about half of Americans over the age of 50. But, young people can experience gum recession too. You may be genetically predisposed to gum recession. Some people are born with thin gums. Other times the environment might contribute to recession. Things like aggressive brushing, trauma, surgery or ill-fitting partials can cause recession.

    Treatment of Gum Recession
    If you notice a tooth looks long or you experience sensitivity or pain when brushing and flossing, you could have gum recession. Be sure to come in and have one of the doctors take a look. If you have recession we can typically graft a small amount of skin from your palate and patch it over the receding area. The treatment helps protect the tooth from further damage. It is a minor procedure that can be done for a single tooth or multiple teeth depending on your need.

What are you waiting for?

At Drum Hill Dental, we believe in providing the best dental care at the most affordable prices. Make your next appointment using our easy online scheduling tool, contact our office if you have any questions, or explore all of the dental services we provide.